Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts. Volume 5, Number 2. Guillaume Apollinaire, Jean Toomer, William Carlos Williams, Virginia Woolf, Harold Loeb.
Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts. Volume 5, Number 2
Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts. Volume 5, Number 2

Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts. Volume 5, Number 2

New York: Broom Publishing Company, September, 1923. Single volume, measuring 11 x 8 inches: 65-125, [3]. Original pictorial wrappers printed in blue and black, table of contents printed on inside front wrapper, subscription form printed on inside rear wrapper. Illustrated with photographs and black-and-white vignettes throughout text. Lightly creased.

September 1923 issue of Broom: An International Magazine of the Arts, the modernist review founded by Harold Loeb, co-owner of Greenwich Village’s Sunwise Turn Bookshop, and poet Alfred Kreymborg. Broom’s history was a complicated one: its twenty-one issues were published first in Rome (1921-1922), then in Berlin (1922-1923), and finally in New York City (1923-1924), and the magazine operated continually on the brink of financial collapse. Even so, by 1923 Broom “had become virtually synonymous with ‘cosmopolitan’ American modernism” (Eric White, Transatlantic Avant-Gardes, 129). This issue features a cover design by the Polish painter Alice Halicka, Virginia Woolf’s “In the Orchard,” William Carlos Williams’s “The Fountain of Eternal Youth,” and an English translation of Guillaume Apollinaire’s “The Poet Assassinated.” Perhaps most notable is the first appearance of the final sections of Jean Toomer's “Kabnis,” the long story that concludes his groundbreaking collection Cane: “When you had eyes, did you ever see th beauty of th world? Tell me that. The hell y did. Now dont tell me. I know y didnt. . . . no eyes that have seen beauty ever lose their sight.” A bright, near-fine survival.

Price: $650.00