Working with the Hands: Being a Sequel to “Up From Slavery” Covering the Author's Experiences in Industrial Training at Tuskegee. Booker T. Washington, Frances Benjamin Johnston, photographer.
Working with the Hands: Being a Sequel to “Up From Slavery” Covering the Author's Experiences in Industrial Training at Tuskegee
Working with the Hands: Being a Sequel to “Up From Slavery” Covering the Author's Experiences in Industrial Training at Tuskegee
Working with the Hands: Being a Sequel to “Up From Slavery” Covering the Author's Experiences in Industrial Training at Tuskegee
Working with the Hands: Being a Sequel to “Up From Slavery” Covering the Author's Experiences in Industrial Training at Tuskegee

Working with the Hands: Being a Sequel to “Up From Slavery” Covering the Author's Experiences in Industrial Training at Tuskegee

New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1904. Single volume, measuring 8 x 5 inches: x, 246. Original burgundy ribbed cloth lettered in gilt, top edge gilt, other edges uncut. Frontispiece portrait of Washington and 31 black-and-white photographic plates throughout text. Light shelfwear to binding, spine lightly sunned.

First edition of Booker T. Washington’s sequel to Up from Slavery, a detailed account of the curriculum of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Washington was a national advocate for “hand training,” educating African-American students for agricultural work, domestic labor, and the trades in the decades after the Civil War: “as a slave the Negro was worked; as a freeman he must learn to work.” His account of Tuskegee students building their own dormitories, making their own clothes, and harvesting their own crops is illustrated with photographs by American photojournalist Frances Benjamin Johnston, who visited Tuskegee at Washington's invitation in 1902. Her large-format images celebrate the nobility of modern industrial labor, from the foundry to the fields. A very good copy.

Price: $225.00